Sarah Arabella Watson


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Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher was born December, 1829, in Baltimore, Baltimore Co., MD, and died December 11, 1870, in Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, at age 41. Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA. He is the son of Edward Fisher of Unknown and Sarah Hanson of Unknown, who were married September 27, 1824, in Kent Co., DE. Fenwick Fisher, Charles Edward Fisher and Samuel Hanson Fisher were brothers. Came to California by boat in 1853, and was publisher of The Beacon newspaper in Red Bluff from 1857 to 1863. At the time of his death he was the Business Manager of the Sacramento Daily Reporter newspaper and also a State Printing Expert.

Elizabeth Noland was born August 9, 1829, in Cole Co., MO, and died May 22, 1862, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA, at age 32. Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA.  She is the daughter of Martin D. Noland (born November 7, 1804, in Kentucky - died April 3, 1862, in Jefferson City, Cole Co., MO) of Kent Co., MO, and Sarah Hardin Lamkin (born January 29, 1808 - died April 16, 1881) of Kentucky. At the time of her death, Charles Edward Fisher was the editor of the Red Bluff Beacon. Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA. Stone with Florence Harris.

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher and Elizabeth Noland were married March 2, 1853, in Cole Co., MO.

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher and Elizabeth (Noland) Fisher had three children:

  1. Sarah Elizabeth "Sallie" Fisher: Born 1854 in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA; Died after 1870 in Unknown.
  2. Florence Harris Fisher: Born February 20, 1857, at Fisher's ranch, two miles south of Tehama, Tehama Co., CA; Died December 29, 1857, at Fisher's ranch, two miles south of Tehama, Tehama Co., CA (age Infant).
  3. Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA.
  4. Jessie Antoinette Fisher: Born March 6, 1859, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA; Died January 26, 1891, in Belleview, Blaine Co., ID (age 31). Married August 7, 1883, in Boise, Ada Co., ID, to Nathan Carlton Burdett DeLano: Born October 31, 1852, in Cuba, Alleghany Co., NY; Died February 10, 1946, in Los Angeles Co., CA (age 94).

After Elizabeth (Noland) Fisher died, Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher married Sarah Arabella "Belle" Watson, a minor. See Tehama Co. CA, Genealogical Society.

Sarah Arabella "Belle" Watson was born September 16, 1844, in New York, and died December 5, 1905, in Ocean Park, Los Angeles Co., CA, at age 61. Buried in Hollywood Memorial Cemetery (Hollywood Forever Cemetery), Hollywood, Los Angeles Co., CA. She is the daughter of William Watson of Ireland, and Abigail Harrington of Watkins Glen, Tompkins Co., NY.

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher (age 34) and Sarah Arabella "Belle" Watson (age 19) were married February 9, 1864, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA.

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher and Sarah Arabella "Belle" (Watson) Fisher had two children:

  1. Charles Edward Fisher Jr.: Born about February, 17, 1865, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA; Died October 14, 1868, in Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA (age 3 Years, 6 Months). Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA.
  2. Arabella Fisher: Born April, 1869, in Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA; Died December 2, 1919, at her home, 2095 East Colorado St., Pasadena, Los Angeles Co., CA (age 50). Married (1) Unknown to Unknown: Born Unknown; Unknown. Married (2) about 1898 in California to Charles Hamilton Ritchie: Born August 12, 1871, in Detroit, Wayne Co., MI; Died Tuesday, April 9,1935, at his home, South Pasadena, Los Angeles Co., CA (age 63).

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher was killed by Charles Dell on December 14, 1870, in Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA. Charles Love Dell (Born about 1850 in Texas; Died after 1900); was Insane by 1900) was charged with murder. Fisher considered Dell (age 20) to be an unsatisfactory acquaintance for his daughter, Sarah E. Fisher, who would have been 16 years old at that time. Edward Potter was about age 21 at that time, and was a telegraph operator. Fenwick Fisher was born September 20, 1825, in Delaware and died December 31, 1892, in Sonoma Co., Ca, at age 67. He is a brother of Charles Edward Fisher.

After Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher died, Sarah Arabella "Belle" (Watson) Fisher married John Wesley Lemmon.

John Wesley Lemmon was born August 15, 1831, near Quincy, Adams Co., IL, and died October 23, 1902, in Portland, Multnomah Co., OR, at age 71. He is the son of Washington Lemmon of Shelbyville, Shelby Co., KY, and Tamer Stephens of Frankfort, Franklin Co., KY.

John Wesley Lemmon (age 43) and Sarah Arabella "Belle" (Watson) Fisher (age 30) were married December 25, 1874, in Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory.

John Wesley Lemmon and Sarah Arabella "Belle" (Watson) (Fisher) Lemmon had one child:

  1. Charles Fisher Lemmon: Born June 13, 1877, in Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory; Died April 20, 1948, probably in Hawaii (age 70). Buried in Plot: Ocean View-Block E-Grave 082, Santa Barbara Cemetery, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co., CA. Married December 12, 1900, in San Francisco, San Francisco Co., CA, to Isabelle Edith Matheson: Born June 29, 1879, in San Francisco, San Francisco Co., CA; Died December 21, 1940, in Santa Barbara Co., CA (age 61). Buried in Plot: Ocean View-Block E-Grave 082, Santa Barbara Cemetery, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co., CA.



TIMELINE


Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher, Elizabeth (Noland) Fisher, and their daughter, Florence Harris Fisher, are buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA. Photos are courtesy of Phoebe Larne, as shared with the Tehama County Genealogical & Historical Society.


Sarah Arabella "Belle" (Watson) (Fisher) Lemmon died December 5, 1905, in Ocean Park, Los Angeles Co., CA, at age 61. Buried in Hollywood Memorial Cemetery (Hollywood Forever Cemetery), Hollywood, Los Angeles Co., CA. Thanks to Find-A-Grave for making these images available.


Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher was born December, 1829, in Baltimore, Baltimore Co., MD.

Elizabeth Noland was born August 9, 1829, in Cole Co., MO.

Sarah Arabella "Belle" Watson was born September 16, 1844, in New York.


MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW.

The Texas Democrat was started at Springfield in 1846. The name given to the paper, it was hoped, would add to its popularity. The annexation of Texas to the United States by an act of Congress in 1846 was of special interest to Missouri. Texas had been largely settled by Missourians. Missourians without authority from State or Nation had aided in establishing the Republic of Texas and winning freedom from Mexico.

The Texas Democrat was established by John P. Campbell to advocate his claims to election to Congress. Congressmen were elected by districts for the first time in Missouri in 1846. Campbell's opponent was John S. Phelps. E. D. McKinney, Campbell's son-in-law, was editor of the paper. Campbell was defeated and, having no further use for a paper, sold The Texas Democrat to Charles E. Fisher and J. D. Schwartz. They changed its name and its politics to Whig. Littleberry Hendricks, who had been defeated in the election of 1848, for Lieutenant Governor, became the editor. The Whigs were proud of their paper and gave it very fair support for a time, but subscribers began to stop taking it and the editors stopped its publication on September 15, 1849. The press and material were moved to Osceola and used to start a paper there.


The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 14, 1850, shows William Watson (age 40) born in Ireland with real estate of $150 is a Mason and is living in the Town of Penfield, Monroe Co., NY. Living with him is Abigail Watson (age 25) born in New York. Also living there are four Watson children, all born in New York: Elizabeth Watson (age 8); Sarah Watson (age 6); Warren Watson (age 4); and Mary J. Watson (age 5/12).

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 16, 1850, shows Charles E. Fisher (age 21) born in Maryland is a Printer and is living in District 79, St. Clair Co., MO. Living with him are: James W. Boren (age 25) born in Tennessee, a Printer; and Marzierahu Cocke (age 15), a Printer.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on August 21, 1850, shows Martin D. Noland (age 45) born in Kentucky with real estate worth $1,500 is a Clergyman (Baptist Minister) and is living in Cole Co., MO. Living with him are: Sarah H. Noland (age 42) born in Kentucky; Elizabeth Noland (age 20) born in Missouri; Samuel H. Noland (age 17) born in Missouri, a Farmer; George W. Noland (age 15) born in Missouri, a Farmer; Sarah Noland (age 12) born in Missouri; Rachel Noland (age 10) born in Missouri; Martin D. Noland (age 7) born in Missouri; James W. Noland (age 5) born in Missouri; Hinton N. Noland (age 2) born in Missouri; and John H. Noland (age 1/12) born in Missouri.

The 1850 U. S. Census taken on December 7, 1850, shows Martin D. Noland (age 45) born in Kentucky with real estate worth $1,400 is a Gold Miner and is living in Placerville and Vicinity, El Dorado Co., CA. Living with him are: Samuel H. Noland (age 18) born in Missouri, a Gold Miner; George W. Noland (age 15) born in Missouri, a Gold Miner; and Albert G. Scraggs (age 15) born in Missouri with real estate worth $4,200, a Gold Miner.

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher and Elizabeth Noland were married March 2, 1853, in Cole Co., MO.

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher and his wife came to California in 1853.

Tehama Co., CA, was created April 9, 1856, from portions of Colusa, Butte and Shasta Counties.


Daily Globe, San Francisco, San Francisco Co., CA, Saturday, June 6, 1857

Tall Corn.

C. E. Fisher, who has a ranch two miles below Tehama, has exhibited at the office of the Red Bluff Beacon a stalk of corn measuring nine feet in length. He has five acres, of which this is a fair sample. He also has thirty acres of wheat that stands thick on the ground and with well filled heads, which average five feet in height. It is thought that this crop will yield fifty bushels to the acre.


Florence Harris Fisher was born February 20, 1857, at Fisher's ranch, two miles south of Tehama, Tehama Co., CA.

Florence Harris Fisher died December 29, 1857, at Fisher's ranch, two miles south of Tehama, Tehama Co., CA, at age 10 Months and 9 Days.


Daily Globe, San Francisco, San Francisco Co., CA, Friday, January 22, 1858

DIED At Fisher's Ranch, near Tehama, Dec. 29th, Florence Harris, infant daughter of Charles E. and Elizabeth N. Fisher, aged 10 months and 9 days.


Jessie Antoinette Fisher was born March 6, 1859, in Red Bluff, Red Bluff Twp., Tehama Co., CA.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 29, 1860, shows C. E. Fisher (age 30) born in Missouri with personal estate of $3,000 is the Editor of the Beacon and is living in Red Bluff, Red Bluff Twp., Tehama Co., CA. Living with him are: E. N. Fisher (age 30) born in Missouri; a male, S. E. Fisher (age 6) born in California; and a male, J. W. Fisher (age 1) born in California. Leigh Larson note: Elizabeth Noland was born August 9, 1829, in Cole Co., MO, and died May 22, 1862, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA, at age 32. She is the daughter of Martin D. Noland of Kent Co., MO, and Sarah Hardin Lamkin of Kentucky. At the time of her death, Charles Edward Fisher was the editor of the Red Bluff Beacon. Samuel Hardin Noland is her brother.

The 1860 U. S. Census taken on July 29, 1860, shows S. H. Noland (age 28) born in Missouri is a Printer and is living in Red Bluff, Red Bluff Twp., Tehama Co., CA. Living with him is a female: S. C. Baker (age 26) born in New Brunswick. Leigh Larson note: Samuel Hardin Noland was born September 25, 1832, in Missouri and died March 13, 1869, in Red Bluff. He is the son of Martin D. Noland of Kent Co., MO, and Sarah Sarah Hardin Lamkin of Kentucky. Sarah Noland is his sister.



Sarah Arabella "Belle" Watson came to California about 1861.

The Red Bluff Beacon was sold in 1862 to Charles Fisher, connected with The Sacramento Union newspaper.

Elizabeth (Noland) Fisher died May 22, 1862, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA, at age 32.


The Stockton Daily Independent, Stockton, CA, Thursday, May 29, 1862

DEATHS

The wife of Charles FISHER, Esq., editor of the Red Bluff 'Beacon, died on the 22d.


The Sonoma County Journal, Petaluma, Sonoma Co. CA., October 1862

C. E. FISHER, editor of the Red Bluff, 'Beacon', has returned from a visit to the Eastern States. Welcome Home, Charley!


Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher (age 34) and Sarah Arabella "Belle" Watson (age 19) were married February 9, 1864, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA.


Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, February 12, 1864

MARRIED.

At Red Bluff, Feb. 9th, by Warren T. Sexton, CHAS. E. FISHER, late of the Red Bluff Beacon, to Miss S. BELLE WATSON.


Charles Edward Fisher Jr. was born about February, 17, 1865, in Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA.

The 1867 Great Register shows Charles Edward Fisher, age 35, was living in Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA. He first registered for voting there on July 26, 1866.

The 1868 Sacramento, CA, City Directory shows Fisher C. E., printer and State Expert; bds Golden Eagle, 189 K st.

Charles Edward Fisher Jr. died October 14, 1868, in Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, at age 3 Years, 6 Months. Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Red Bluff, Tehama Co., CA.


Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, November 23, 1869

THE COURTS.

Probate Court.

MONDAY, November 22d.

Estate and Guardianship of Sarah Elizabeth Fisher and Jessie Antoinette Fisher, minors - Charles E. Fisher appointed guardian upon filling bond in the sum of $300.


The 1870 U. S. Census taken on June 26, 1870, shows Sarah Noland (age 63) born in Kentucky with real estate of $2,800 and personal estate of $1,000 is House Keeping and is living in Jefferson Twp., Cole Co., MO. Living with her are: George Noland (age 35) born in Missouri, a Farmer; James Noland (age 25) born in Missouri, a Farmer; John Noland (age 20) born in Missouri, a Farmer; Sarah Noland (age 22) born in Missouri; Jessie Fisher (age 10) born in California; Sarah Benton (age 25) born in Missouri, a black Servant; and John Benton (age 2) born in Missouri. Leigh Larson note: The George Gordon family lives next door.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 31, 1870, shows C. E. Fisher (age 40) born in Maryland with personal estate of $800 is a Printer and is living in the 3rd Ward, City of Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA. Living with him are: Sarah A. Fisher (age 25) born in New York, who is Keeping House; Sarah E. Fisher (age 16) born in California; a female, A. B. Fisher (age 1) born in California; Fenwick Fisher (age 44) born in Delaware, a Printer; and Maggie Trainer (age 17) born in Ireland, a Servant.

The 1870 U. S. Census taken on August 11, 1870, shows Edward Potter (age 21) born in Illinois with personal estate of $100 is a Telegraph Operator and is living in the 2nd Ward, City of Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA.

Charles Edward "Charley" Fisher was killed by Charles Dell on December 14, 1870, in Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA. Charles Love Dell (Born about 1850 in Texas; Died after 1900, and judged Insane by 1900) was charged with murder. Fisher considered Dell (age 20) to be an unsatisfactory acquaintance for his daughter, Sarah E. Fisher, who would have been 16 years old at that time. Edward Potter was about age 21 at that time, and was a telegraph operator. Charles Dell was acquitted of the charge, due to it being in self defense.


Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, December 12, 1870

CITY INTELLIGENCE.

HOMICIDE. - About quarter past 9 o'clock last night Charles E. Fisher, business manager of the Reporter, was shot and almost instantly killed at his residence on Ninth street, near J., over Miller's stable, by Charles Dell, a step-son of L. B. Harris, and at one time a student with Dr. Thomas. It appears that Dell and a daughter of Fisher were quite fond of each other, but her father did not for some reason deem him a suitable companion for her. However this may be, Fisher on sundry occasions forbid Dell his house, and probably intimated that he would cane him if he neglected the warning, for Dell is reported to have said that if Fisher "fooled with him he would shoot him." Last evening Fenwick Fisher, brother of Charles, took Mrs. Fisher and his sister over to the Fair at Turner Hall, leaving Miss Fisher at home. Coming down directly afterward he met his brother, who presently walked home. On his arrival there he found the parlor occupied by his daughter, Dell, and a young man named Potter. It would seem that he ordered Dell to leave, and on his refusing or neglecting to do so, commenced striking him with his cane, which was one unusually heavy. Dell drew a pistol after being struck and fired three shots, one of which struck Fisher in the right breast, about two inches above and to the left of the nipple, probably severing an artery; another bullet grazed his side, breaking the flesh, and the third passed through the window. After the firing of the shots, Dell and Fisher had a slight scuffle, during which they fell over the stove, and then the former broke away, ran down the stairs and disappeared. The report of firearms soon called to the scene a number of persons, and as soon as it became evident that Fisher was mortally wounded, his wife and brother were sent for. Their grief may be imagined. Special officer Jackson, who was the first officer on the spot, obtained possession of the pistol with which the shooting was done, and soon afterwards started out to obtain assistance to find Dell. Officers Rider and Swift in due time answered his whistle, and after viewing the premises, the trio visited the residence of Harris, at Seventh and H streets, and found Dell there. He had come home bleeding profusely from wounds on his head, and also suffering from bruises on his arm, and was in a fainting condition. Restoratives were administered. A physician who was sent for speedily arrived and found that he had three or four severe cuts on the head, and that he was in such a critical condition that it would be impossible to move him, and the officers therefore decided that they could do nothing in the premises. Our reported, who visited Dell in company with the officers, was informed by him in a faint whisper that he called to see Miss Fisher that it was his last call, and that he had only come to try and explain away the misunderstanding existing. Fisher would not listen to him, but struck him four times on the head and arm with his cane, although he tried to avoid the blows. Feeling the blood running down into his eyes, he drew his pistol and told Fisher not to strike again or he would shoot him. Fisher said, "Don't you shoot," and struck again, and he then (Dell) fired and afterwards closed upon him, and they fell over the stove. Dell was certainly badly hurt by Fisher, whether before or after the shooting; it would naturally seem to have been before. The wall along the stairway by which he descended from the parlor in which the shots were fired bears marks of blood, and toward the foot of the stairs it would seem as if Dell had staggered to the door. Coroner Counts will hold an inquest upon the body at 10 o'clock this morning.


Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, December 30 or 31, 1870

CITY INTELLIGENCE.

EXAMINATION OF CHARLES DELL. - The examination of Charles Dell, charged with the killing of Charles E. Fisher, took place in the Sixth District Court yesterday afternoon before A. Henley, Police Judge. The interest of the public in this case was manifested by the fact that the Court-room was crowded all the afternoon. District Attorney Alexander and Deputy District Attorney Brown conducted the prosecution, and N. Greene Curtis and S. L. Denson the defense. The first witness introduced by the prosecution was Miss Sallie Fisher, daughter of the deceased, whose evidence was essentially the same as given before the Coroner's jury. J. W. Byington, John Morgan, Fred. Patton, and Oscar Marshall were introduced in an endeavor to prove that Dell had on occasions prior to the shootings threatened Fisher; they testified, however, that they had never heard him make any threats against the deceased, though the first mentioned witness had heard him use harsh language against Fenwick Fisher, brother of Chas. E. Dr. Montgomery testified as to the nature of the wounds received by the deceased, as did also James McKibben. F. R. Dray, special officer Jackson and Coroner Counts, gave evidence as to the finding of the pistol and other minor matters. At the conclusion of the Coroner's testimony, the prosecution rested. The defense first introduced E. W. Potter, who was in the room with Dell and Miss Fisher, when the shooting occurred. His statements, though somewhat more in detail, were in all important respects the same as before the Coroner, though he was somewhat closely cross-examined, Dr Thomas was next put upon the stand to testify as to the injuries which Dell received during the conflict. He stated that when he reached his house to attend him he found his vest and coat dripping with blood, and his pulse indicating that he had lost nearly if not quite all of the blood he could bear. On examining his head he found a ragged cut, about three inches long, on the left side of the crown of the head, which evidently had been made with a blunt instrument. From this wound the blood was jetting. He took instant measures to stop the flow of blood, which was proceeding from an artery. Subsequently he found that his patient had received a heavy blow on the back of the head, a little on one side, causing a lump half the size of an English walnut to form; another blow on the left forearm, which had fractured the bone but without causing displacement; also a heavy bruise and swelling on the shoulder. From the effects of the blow which severed the artery Dell would have bled to death in a very few minutes if he had not received surgical attendance. The weapon with which the blow was inflicted glanced, or else it would without doubt have fractured the skull. The defendant was put on the stand to testify in his own behalf. He appeared quite weak, had bandages about his head, and carried his left arm in a sling. His account of the matter was similar to that of Miss Fisher and Potter, and in consonance with that which he gave our reporter on the night of the shooting. It was to the effect that he and the other two occupants of the room were sitting talking, when he heard the folding doors open, and looking up saw Fisher standing between them. The latter entered, closed the doors after him, and advanced toward the defendant, inquiring "What are you doing here, sir?" He replied, "Mr. Fisher, I came here to have an interview with your daughter, so that we may have no more trouble;" Fisher, refusing to hear any explanations, raised his cane and struck Dell, who, as the blow descended, was in the act off rising from his chair; he followed up the first blow with three or four others; Dell put up his left arm to save his head, and received a hit which rendered the arm powerless; he turned and used his right arm to ward off the cane, and Fisher struck and missed; Dell felt the blood running down from his head and began to grow weak; told Fisher if he did not stop he would shoot; Fisher said, "Don't you draw a pistol on me," and struck again; Dell tried to get to the folding doors, but Fisher headed him off; fired a shot thinking he would shoot over him and intimidate him into getting out of the way; Fisher continued to strike, still being between Dell and the doors, and the second shot was fired; after the second shot Fisher struck twice; by this time they were near the stove; Fisher raised his cane in both hands, and Dell fired for the third time, and, being faint, fell, just as Fisher also went down; Dell got up and left the house as best he could; scarcely knew how he got home. On the cross-examination stated that he was positive Fisher had never ordered him not to enter his house; they had had a misunderstanding; did not send Potter up into the house to see if Fisher was there; had not a preconcerted plan of action with Potter; it was his general habit to whistle while walking; had been in the habit of carrying a pistol almost every night for two or three years. During the cross-examination, the defense expressed a willingness to narrate a conversation which Fisher and Dell had had concerning the latter's visiting the former's premises, but the prosecution did not desire to have it brought out. It was intimated, however, that Fisher's remarks had been to the effect that he did not want Dell around his house. Two or three other witnesses were examined, on the part of the defense to prove minor points, and when the defense rested Fenwick Fisher was introduced in rebuttal. The case was argued briefly and submitted. Judge Henley, after a brief review of the facts, stated that he would dismiss the defendant.


The Rockland County Journal, Nyack, Rockland Co., NY, Saturday, December 31, 1870

TRAGEDY IN SACRAMENTO, CAL. - In the Sacramento Union of the 15th inst. we find the particulars of a tragedy in which an intimate friend of ours in days past came to his death. The friend here alluded to was Charles E. Fisher, who, for a long time, was editor of the Red Bluff Beacon, published at Red Bluff, Tehama county, but recently business manager of the Sacramento Reporter. It would appear that a young man named Dell, and Mr. Fisher's daughter were quite fond of each other, but, for some cause, her father deemed him an unsuitable companion for his daughter, and on several occasions forbade the house. One evening, when all of the inmates were absent except Miss Fisher, Mr. Dell came to the house, and was found there when Mr. Fisher returned home. The latter ordered Dell to leave, and on his refusing or neglecting to do so commenced striking him with his cane, whish was an unusually heavy one. Dell drew a pistol after being struck, and fired three shots, one of which struck Fisher in the right breast, and another grazed his side, breaking the flesh, and the third passed through the window. After the firing of the shots, Dell and Fisher had a scuffle, during which they fell over the stove and then the former broke away, ran down stairs and disappeared. On examination, Mr. Fisher was found to be mortally wounded, and his death occurred in a short time. Dell was secured, bruised and bleeding, and on being questioned as to his reasons for shooting Fisher, said he did it in self-defence and told Fisher he would do it if he struck him again. Mr. Fisher was forty-one years old, a native of Pennsylvania and removed to California from Missouri. He was generally known as a good-natured, well meaning man.


Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, January 1, 1872

PROBATE COURT.

R. C. Clark, Judge, and W. B. C. Brown, ex-officio Clerk. Following is a list of letters testamentary, of administration and guardianship granted the year past:

LETTERS OF GUARDIANSHIP.

Minors. Guardian Appointed.

Sarah E. Fisher.........George H. Winterburn, Jan. 10.

Jessie A. Fisher.........George H. Winterburn, Jan. 10.


Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, January 23, 1872

THE COURTS.

Supreme Court.

Probate Court. - Judge R. C. CLARK presiding.

MONDAY, TUESDAY, March 5th.

Guardianship of Jessie A. Fisher, minor - George H. Winterburn, to pay $880, residue of her estate, to W. A. Gordon, her guardian in Missouri, and take his receipt therefor.


Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, Sacramento Co., CA, March 6, 1872

THE COURTS.

Supreme Court.

Probate Court. - Judge R. C. CLARK presiding.

MONDAY, TUESDAY, March 5th.

Guardianship of Jessie A. Fisher, minor - George H. Winterburn, guardian of the estate of said minor, having paid over to George W. A. Gordon the sum of $871.30, the amount of the estate in his hands, and filed a receipt therefor, is ordered that his letters be vacated, his sureties discharged, and the estate settled and closed.


Thorpe Gordon
Thorpe J. Gordon was born in Cole County September 29, 1891, of a pioneer family. His father was Charles Alexander Gordon, born in what was known as the Gordon neighborhood near Scruggs Station in Cole County, died May 24, 1937 at the age of eighty-two years, the last surviving member of his generation of the Gordon family. During his active years he owned and operated a farm in the Gordon settlement near the place of his birth. He moved to Jefferson City many years prior to his death.

Charles A. Gordon was the son of William James Gordon, a native of Virginia. His mother, whose maiden name was Eliza Noland, was a sister of Martin Noland, pioneer teacher and Baptist preacher of Cole County. Thorpe Gordon's mother, whose maiden name was Georgia Ann Dickerson, was born October 22, 1864, in the old Gordon neighborhood. She was a school teacher prior to her marriage to Charles A. Gordon and died in Jefferson City December 21, 1920. Her father, Jacob Dickerson, died before her birth and she was reared by her uncle, George W. Rains, who conducted one of the largest flour mills in the county at Scruggs Station.

Thorpe J. Gordon began his career in the undertaking business in December 1910, when he was employed by the Walther-Wymore Furniture and Undertaking Company, which was owned by the late George W. Walther, and continued in that firm until 1927 when he established his own business as successor to that company. The building his company occupied was formerly the home of Major Winfield Scott Pope, a distinguished attorney of Jefferson City. This large old home was extensively remodeled as to have been virtually rebuilt around 1937.

Mr. Gordon was married to Miss Margie Irene Donaldson on December 22, 1937. Miss Donaldson's home was in Montgomery City. She was the daughter of R. H. and Mary Donaldson.

Mr. Gordon served two terms as President of the Chamber of Commerce in 1936 and 1937. He was president of the Rotary Club and served two terms as commander of Roscoe Enloe Post Number 5, American Legion. In World War I he served overseas with Company B, 337th machine gun battalion. He was a member of the Methodist Church and of the board of stewards of that church. In 1937 he was elected a member of the Jefferson City School Board.


Washington Lemmon’s oldest son, James William Lemmon, came to Utah with the Mormon Battalion. His second son, John, came with the gold rush and went to California. After the family had been in Utah several years a man came to their place and wanted a place in sleep and something to eat. The family lived on the county road and they had that kind of request quite often. This night while they were eating, the man said "I am you son." Tamer, his mother went over to him and turned his sleeve up and there was a scar on his arm and his mother said "Yes, you are my son John." This was a pleasant surprise for the family.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, July 1, 1873

JOHN LEMON, the excelsior manipulator of the ribbons for the Northwestern Stage Co., came in town Sunday morning, and paid his respects to this office. John drives by the side of Sam Job, from La Grande to Cayuse station, over the blue mountains. He said he tore himself away from his lady friends, and everyone else on his beat, and is going to spin around the Basin, and probably over to Owyhee, before he returns. We have endorsed his ticket of leave, giving him the liberties of all the towns during his visit, and commending him to our friends generally. If you don't believe he is a clever fellow just take a spin around with him; or get on the box and let him whirl you over and down the Blue mountains with six-in-hand, charging at the rate of two-forty a minute, and when you have landed safely in port, which you may always be sure of, you will say he is "Some Lemon's" whether or no.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, January 15, 1874

JO KEENY, late division agent on the Umatilla line, has gone east, and our old friend, John Lemmon, who used to ply the whip on the Boise and Idaho City route, has been appointed to the position, and a good appointment it is too.


John Wesley Lemmon and Sarah Arabella "Bella/Belle" (Watson) Fisher (age 30) were married December 25, 1874, in Boise, Ada Co., ID.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, February 9, 1875

PROMOTED. - John Lemon, well known by many of our people as a scienced manipulator of the ribbons, has been promoted by the North-western Stage Co. to Charley Haines' place, and is now the Division Agent, and his charge of the route between this place and Kelton. He married an estimable lady last fall, and came in from Kelton, bringing Mrs. Lemon with him last Saturday. He intends, however, to return and make his home for Mrs. L. at Rock Creek, while his own time will be over the road to and from that point. The company have a faithful, energetic man in Mr. Lemon, and we wish him success in his new fields of duty.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, June 8, 1875

JOHN LEMON, the gentleman division agent on the Overland stage road is sojourning in town with his lady.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, July 27, 1875

JOHN LEMON, Division Agent on the overland stage road, came into town last night. John says he will not stop here long, probably go back this morning. Of course he will not stop long - his better half is out on the road.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, April 23, 1876

FORMER RESIDENT PASSES

At the examination of the Sunday school of the Episcopal church on Easter Day, the successful competitors for prizes were the Misses Ella Cartee, Mary Cartee, Lizzie Redway and Belle Lemon. All who were examined acquitted themselves well. At the close of the service the offerings of the school were presented, which amounted to $11.80. This sum is to be applied toward the purchasing of a figured window for the chancel.


The Owyhee Avalance, Owyhee, Idaho Territory, November 25, 1876

Overland Road Jottings Payne's Ferry, Nov. 13

Passing over several small streams, some farming land, a great deal of good grazing country and fourteen miles of road, I arrived at Rattle Snake, or "Mountain Home" Station, run by Mrs. John Lemon, wife of the efficient Division Agent in charge of the Northwestern Stage Company's business from Boise City to Kelton. A new and commodious house has been erected and well furnished considering the country, while the table is provided with the best that can be had. This is the point at which the Rocky Bar Stage connects with the Overland and seems to be favored with a considerable amount of business.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, December 30, 1876

MR. JOHN LEMON has been appointed postmaster of the new post office at Mountain Home, Alturas county.


Originating as the Rattlesnake Stage Station, Mountain Home actually owes its upbringing to the Oregon Short Line Railroad. While working to install a line in the area, OSL Railroad officials created the tent town of Tutville in 1882 to house railroad construction workers and traveling pioneers. Eventually, residential and commercial lots were sold for $25, and the new town began to prosper. At the turn of the century, the city boasted several general stores, two weekly newspapers, a school, three churches, two hotels, and an array of merchants and saloons. The city’s ideal shipping location helped secure the town’s presence on the Idaho frontier, and wool was frequently shipped from the site.

The name Tutville was eventually dropped, and the wife of first postmaster, John Lemmon, selected “Mountain Home” after the distant mountains forming the surrounding county’s northern boundary. Ironically, at an elevation of only 3,180 feet, the town isn’t even in the mountains, and the town is frequently the warmest civilized spot in the state. Although once boasting an economy based upon the shipping industry, Mountain Home’s current economy rests prominently upon Mountain Home Air Force Base.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, January 23, 1877

JOHN LEMON, Division Agent on the overland stage road, is in town. He says the roads are good and everything happy in the staging business.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, July 30, 1878

JOHN LEMON, Division Agent on the Overland stage road and proprietor of Mountain Home station was in town last Sunday. He reports travel improving and the road running in good shape. No sign of Indians has been seen on the road for the last six weeks.


In 1880, Jessie E. Fisher is living in Jefferson Twp., Cole Co., MO.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 4, 1880, shows John Lemmon (age 47) born in Indiana to Tennessee-born parents is a married Contractor and is living at 28 Washington Street, City of Portland, Multnomah Co., OR. Living with him is his wife, Mrs. J. W. Lemmon (age 40) born in Kentucky to English-born parents, who is in Millinery. Also living there are his two children, both born to Tennessee and Indiana-born parents: Ellen Lemmon (age 11) born in California; and Chas. Lemmon (age 3) born in Idaho Territory. Two others also live in the household.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 11, 1880, shows Samuel Blackwell (age 28) born in Arkansas to Tennessee-born parents is a married Farmer and is living in Cold Springs and Bennett Creek, Alturas Co., ID. Living with him is his wife, Mina Blackwell (age 23) born in Minnesota to Doubtful-born parents, who is Keeping House. Also living there are two Boarders: Nathan C. Delano (age 28) born in New York to New York and Vermont-born parents, a Miner; and Frank L. Bird (age 25) (age 11) born in Iowa to Massachusetts-born parents, a Miner.

The 1880 U. S. Census taken on June 22, 1880, shows Aaron Abbe (age 65) born in Canada to Canadian-born parents is a Farmer living in Willamette Slough Precinct, Multnomah Co., OR and was sick on the day of the census taker's visit. Living with him is his wife Abigail Abbe (age 56) born in New York to New York-born parents who Keeps House. Also living there is his daughter Lorinda Abbe ( age 15) born in California to Canadian and New York-born parents. A grandson is also shown: Ch. Lemmen (age 3) born in Idaho Territory to Maine and New York-born parents. An unrelated laborer (age 18) born in Switzerland also lives in the house. Leigh Larson note: Charles Lemmen is the son of Abigail Watson's daughter, Arabella Sarah "Bella" (Watson) (Fisher) Lemmon, who was by then married John Wesley Lemmon.

It appears that after a short residency in Portland, Multnomah Co., OR, from about 1878 to 1880, John Wesley Lemmon and his wife, Sarah Arabella "Bella" (Watson) (Fisher) Lemmon, moved back to Idaho Territory, where he resumed his long-time career as a stagecoach driver.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, May 31, 1881

Mr. John Lemon takes the place of Ben. Hill, resigned, as Division Agent on the Umatilla stage road. John is an old hand at the business, and will put you through safe and quick, as long as good roads last.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, September 3, 1882

Miss Mary Anderson, daughter of Benjamin Anderson; Miss Nellie Trotter, daughter of Charles Trotter, and Miss Belle Lemon, daughter of Mrs. John Lemon, will leave Thursday for Salt Lake City at attend Rowland Hall Female Boarding school, which is under the direction of Bishop Tuttle.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, May 29, 1883

Miss Jessie Fisher, a step-daughter of John Lemmon, of this city, returned home on Sunday from Cold Springs, Umatilla county, where she has recently been engaged in teaching school.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, June 19, 1883

Miss Belle Lemmon returned home Sunday morning from Salt Lake City, where she has been attending the Rowland Hall (Episcopal) school. Miss Lemmon was accompanied by Mrs. Baraum, one of the lady teachers of the school, who is a guest of General Cartee.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, November 15, 1883

Mrs. John Lemmon is talking of going to Oakland, California to spend the winter with her brother.


Nathan Carlton Burdett Delano and Jessie A. Fisher were married August 7, 1883, in Boise, Ada Co., ID.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, Thursday, August 9, 1883

On Tuesday morning at the residence of J. W. Lemmon, Esq., was the scene of a very quiet wedding, the contracting parties being Mr. N. C. Delano, of the firm of Delano & Clay, of Bellevue, and Miss Jessie Fisher, of Jefferson City, Missouri, who has been visiting Mrs. Lemmon for the past year. The newly married twain took their departure about noon for Wood River, followed by the best wishes of their friends, of whom a limited number were in attendance.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, June 3, 1884

Mr. John Lemmon, Division Agent of the U. I. & O. Stage Line was in the city yesterday. He informs us that Mrs. Lemmon is at Wood river on her way home from California and that she will be at home in a few days.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, Saturday, July 26, 1884

Mrs. J. W. Lemmon and her daughter, Miss Bella Lemmon, arrived here on Thursday morning's stage from Bellevue.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, August 9, 1884

Mr. John Lemmon and family have become permanent residents of Weiser City. Mr. Lemmon has taken charge of the Hall House, which he will hereafter conduct as a first-class hotel.


The Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, August 22, 1885

John Lemmon, an old-timer in Idaho, is now running as messenger between Boise City and Winnemucca. A better selection could not have been made.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, July 17, 1886

John Lemon called at the STATESMAN office on his return from the scene of the stage robbery, in Boise county last Monday. The treasury box was found and it had been broken open with a miner's pick by breaking out a portion of the bottom, about three inches wide. The robber had cut off a number of branches of trees and set them around the pile of rocks where he stood completely hidden from view. Owing to the rocky nature of the surrounding ground no tracks could be seen, and no trace of the robbers, except the broken box and cut branches, could be discovered.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, September 28, 1886

Word was received at the Stage Office yesterday that John W. Lemon was probably fatally injured by a run-away team at Sidney, Neb., a few days ago. Mr. Lemon was in the employ of Wells, Fargo & Co. and the Stage Company in Idaho for many years, and only recently was transferred to take charge of a line in Nebraska.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, December 7, 1886

To our great surprise John Lemon, agent of C. O. & I. Stage Company, called on us yesterday looking quite well, fully as well as usual. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX


It appears that John Wesley Lemmon worked as a Stagecoach agent in various states, and following the demise of the stage business by the expansion of the railroads, returned to Portland, Multnomah Co., OR. However, his wife now appears as a resident of Los Angeles, CA, claiming she is a widow. Since John Wesley Lemmon was still alive and living in Portland, OR, they may have been either separated or divorced by this time.

In 1890, Charles Dell was an agent in Sacramento for the Milwaukee and St. Paul.


Arabella's House, 2120 Oak Street, Los Angeles

Colonel's Mansion

The Story of Arabella's House

Perhaps the prettiest house in University Park, this 2-story Victorian has been charming its neighbors since 1897, when Arabella Lemmon, of Kentucky, bought it from subdivider A. J. Miller. Since then, for more than a century, generations have enjoyed its artistic windows, decorative fireplaces, handsome staircase and glowing woodwork.

Today, this charming house offers six rooms plus a large living room, a remodeled kitchen and three full bathrooms with modern fixtures. Behind the scenes, a two-year renovation has added new plumbing and wiring, a laundry room and separate, central heating units for each floor.

There’s high-speed internet service in every room, and eight fully accessible parking spaces at the rear. The surrounding neighborhood is served by USC’s Department of Public Safety.

No wonder that in 2005 the ABC network chose Arabella’s House to film the reality show, “The Scholar,” in which 10 high school seniors lived in the house, attended USC for the summer and competed with each other for a full-ride scholarship.

Arabella’s house is a half-block north of the USC tram on 23rd Street, and one block from Lee’s Market and the 23rd Street Café. Arabella might be proud to know that today her house is an official, contributing structure to the University Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone.


By 1891, Charles Fisher Lemmon was a member of the 1891 Freshman Class of the University of California, Berkeley. His residence is listed as San Francisco, CA.

By 1895, Charles F. Lemmon was a crack member of the Class A racing club in Oakland, CA.

On Wednesday, May 18, 1898, Charles Fisher Lemmon was conferred the degree of D. D. S. at the University of California College of Dentistry, Berkeley, CA.

Maxwell's Los Angeles City Directory and Gazetteer of Southern California 1898 shows: Lemmon Arabella (widow J. W.) r. 2120 Oak.

Los Angeles City Directory 1899 shows: Lemmon Arabella (widow J. W.) r. 2120 Oak.


San Francisco Call, San Francisco, CA, Volume 87, Number 153, April 22, 1900

WARREN M. WATSON HAS RETIRED FROM BUSINESS

OAKLAND. April 21. - W. M. Watson, who has been the head of the W. M. Watson Company, one of the largest wholesale liquor firms in Oakland, has turned his company into a stock concern, and left this week for the Paris Exposition and a trip around the world, accompanied by his wife. Mr. Watson has disposed of his business to a number of his employes and his nephew. Those who now control the company are: C. T. Lemmon, Mr. Watson's nephew; J. J. Carroll of the Louvre. T. W. Sigourney, who has been the head of the store for many years; L. S. Farr, who has been the head bookkeeper, and P. O'Kane, the chief outside man of the company. Mr. Watson retains only a small Interest. W. M. Watson has 'always been one of the leaders in Oakland business circles and has been at the head and front of all moves for the benefit of the city. He will be gone abroad for more than a year.


The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 10, 1900, shows Orrin Abbey (age 85) born January 1815 in England to English-born parents is a widower and is living in Beaver Dam Precinct, Washington Co., OR. He cannot read or write, and is a Naturalized citizen of unknown immigration date. He is a Boarder living with a Farmer family of six named Hamel. Orrin Abbey was misspelled as Orrin Abber.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 11, 1900, shows Charles F. Lemmon (age 22) born June 1877 in Idaho to Massachusetts-born parents is an unmarried Wine Merchant and is lodging at 530 Tenth Street, 5th Ward, City of Oakland, Alameda Co., CA.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 12, 1900, shows Marabella Lemmon (age 51) born September 1848 in Kentucky to Kentucky and Louisiana-born parents with 2 of the 3 children born to her still alive and married for 33 years is a Widowed head of household who owns her home with a mortgage and is living at 2120 Oak Street, 5th Ward, City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA. Living with her are: her son-in-law, Charles H. Ritchie (age 28) born August 1871 in Michigan to Scottish and New York-born parents, who is in Advertising; and her childless newly-wed daughter, Bella F. Ritchie (age 29) born April 1871 in California to Virginia and Kentucky-born parents. Five Boarders and one Servant are also living in the household.

The 1900 U. S. Census taken on June 15, 1900, shows John W. Lemmon (age 68) born August 1831 in Illinois to Virginia and Ohio-born parents is a Farmer who owns his farm free of a mortgage and is living in Beaver Dam Precinct, Washington Co., OR.


John Wesley Lemmon died October 23, 1902, in Portland, Multnomah Co., OR, at age 71.

The 1903 City Directory for Los Angeles, CA, shows Arabelle Lemmon (widow of John W.) is a Copyist Co. Recorder, and boards at 1135 W. 20th.


The Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, CA, Sunday, March 5, 1905

Special to The Herald.

OCEAN PARK, March 4. Mrs. Belle Lemmon, president of the Village Improvement society, and one of the best known and popular women in Ocean Park, was today admitted to a health sanitarium at Glendale.


The Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, CA, Saturday, March 25, 1905

Special to The Herald.

OCEAN PARK, March 24. Mrs. Belle Lemmon, president of the Woman's Improvement society, has returned from Glendale, where she recently went for medical treatment, and is sojourning with her daughter, Mrs. C. H. Ritchie, at 156 Wadsworth avenue.


Arabella Sarah "Bella" (Watson) (Fisher) Lemmon died December 5, 1905, in Ocean Park, Los Angeles Co., CA, at age 61.


The Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, CA, Wednesday, December 6, 1905

BELOVED CLUBWOMAN DIES

Mrs. Arabella Lemmon, for 44 years a Resident of Southern California, Expires at Ocean Park

Special to The Herald.

OCEAN PARK, Dec. 5. - Mrs. Arabella Lemmon, a native of Butler county, Kentucky, 56 years of age, and for forty-four years past a resident of Southern California, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. C. M. Ritchie, at 156 Wadsworth avenue, today. Mrs. Lemmon was one of the organizers and first president of the Village Improvement society and took an active part in all social enterprises of a public or philanthropic nature. Through her efforts the Church of the Good Shepherd, Episcopal, was organized. In Los Angeles Mrs. Lemmon was well known among club women and at the time of her death held membership in the Friday Morning club and the Daughters of the Confederacy. She was also a member of the board of managers of the Y. W. C. A., and vice president of St. Mary's guild of Christ church. The funeral will be held from Christ Episcopal church, Los Angeles, and interment will be in Hollywood cemetery. A son, Dr. C. F. Lemmon of Santa Barbara, and Mrs. C. H. Ritchie are the only surviving relatives.


The Los Angeles Herald, Los Angeles, CA, December 10, 1905

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

Arabella Lemmon to C. F. Lemmon - Lot 35, block D, Central Beach tract . . Gift


The 1910 U. S. Census taken on April 20, 1910, shows Charles F. Lemmon (age 32) born in Idaho to Illinois and Kansas-born parents is a married General Practice Dentist in his first marriage who is renting his home and is living on Ash Street, City of San Buena Ventura, Ventura Twp., Ventura Co., CA. Living with him is his wife of nine years, Isabel E. Lemmon (age 31) born in California to English Canadian-born parents and in her first marriage, with both of the children born to her still alive. Also living there are his two children, both born in California to Idaho and California-born parents: daughter, Jessie V. Lemmon (age 8); and Warren W. Lemmon (age 4).

The 1910 U. S. Census taken on May 4, 1910, shows Nathan C. Delano (age 59) born in New York to New York and Vermont-born parents and in his second marriage is a General Retail Merchant who is renting his home and is living on San Bernardino Road, City of Covina, Rowland Twp., Los Angeles Co., CA. Living with him is his wife of 15 years, Emma T. Delano (age 37) born in Nebraska to German and Virginia-born parents and in her first marriage, with 2 of the 3 children born to her still alive. Also living with him are his two daughters, both born in Idaho to New York and Nebraska-born parents: Helen Delano (age 13); and Bessie Delano (age 11). Also living there is his widowed stepfather: Thomas H. Young (age 92) born in New Jersey to New Jersey-born parents.

The WWI Draft Registration Report dated September 12, 1918, shows Charles Fisher Lemmon (age 41) born June 13, 1877, is a self-employed Dentist and is living at 120 W. Haley, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co., CA. His nearest relative is Mrs. Isabelle Lemmon.

Arabella "Belle" (Fisher) Ritchie died December 2, 1919, in Los Angeles Co., CA, at age 50.


The Idaho Statesman, Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, December 28, 1919

FORMER RESIDENT PASSES

Mrs. C. H. Ritchie Dies at Home in Pasadena, California.

Friends in the city have received the news of the death of Mrs. C. H. Ritchie of Pasadena, who will be remembered by pioneers of the city as Belle Lemon, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Lemon. Mr. Lemon was connected with the stage line in the early days. Speaking of her death a Pasadena paper says:

Many Pasadenans will learn with keen regret of the death yesterday of Mrs. C. H. Ritchie of 2095 East Colorado street. Though prominent in women's club life of southern California, she had not taken a very active interest in that work in the short time she had lived here, and is probably best known locally because of being director of the Pasadena Food Center during the war. She gave so generously of her time and energies for wartime purposes here and as a speaker in other parts of the Southland that her health failed and for several months she has been rapidly failing. Mrs. Ritchie was more prominent in club life while living at Santa Monica and Venice than since moving to Pasadena two years ago. She was chairman of the district Federation of Women's clubs, an active member and official of the Sunshine club, was a past president of the first district of California Congress of Mothers and P. T. A. of which she was parliamentarian at the time of her death. She was a member of the Shakespeare club and active in the work of the department of science of government.


The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 5, 1920, shows Charles F. Lemmon (age 42) born in Idaho to Illinois and Missouri-born parents is a married Dentist with his Own Office who is renting his home and is living at 120 West Haley Street, 5th Ward, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co., CA. Living with him is his wife, Isabel E. Lemmon (age 40) born in California to English Canadian-born parents. Also living there are his two unmarried children, both born in California to Idaho and California-born parents: daughter, Jessie V. Lemmon (age 18); and Warren W. Lemmon (age 14).

The 1920 U. S. Census taken on January 5, 1920, shows Nathan Delano (age 68) born in New York to United States and Vermont-born parents is Not Employed who owns his home with a mortgage and is living at 3025 Margarita Street, City of Long Beach, Long Beach Twp., Los Angeles Co., CA. Living with him is his wife, Emma T. Delano (age 45) born in Nebraska to German and Virginia-born parents. Also living with him are his two unmarried daughters, both born in Idaho to New York and Nebraska-born parents: Helen Delano (age 23), a Stenographer at an Oil Company; and Bessie Delano (age 21), a Music Teacher. Also living there is his widowed mother-in-law: Mary Davis (age 67) born in Virginia to Virginia-born parents.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 7, 1930, shows Dr. Charles F. Lemmon (age 51) born in Idaho to Illinois and Missouri-born parents is a married Dentist on his Own Account who owns his home worth $15,000 and is living at 2325 Wellington Avenue, 5th Ward, City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co., CA. Living with him is his wife, Isabelle Lemmon (age 51) born in California to English Canadian-born parents. Also living there are his two unmarried children, both born in California to Idaho and California-born parents: daughter, Jessie Lemmon (age 28), a School Teacher; and Warren Lemmon (age 24), an Artist on his Own Account.

The 1930 U. S. Census taken on April 14, 1930, shows Nathan C. Delano (age 77) born in New York to New York and Vermont-born parents and first married at age 30 is Not Employed owns his home worth $8,000 and is living at 2139 Alma Street, San Pedro District, City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA. Living with him is his wife, Emma T. Delano (age 56) born in Nebraska to German and Virginia-born parents and first married at age 22. Also living with him is his unmarried daughter, Bessie M. Delano (age 30) born in Idaho to New York and Nebraska-born parents, a Teacher at a Main School. Also living there is his widowed mother-in-law: Mary C. Davies (age 79) born in Virginia to Virginia-born parents.

In 1941, Warren Lemmon was still an Artist living with his parents in Santa Barbara, CA.

Charles Fisher Lemmon was born June 13, 1877, in Boise, Ada Co., Idaho Territory, and died April 20, 1948, in Unknown at age 70. He is the son of John Wesley Lemmon: Born August 15, 1831, near Quincy, Adams Co., IL; Died October 23, 1902, in Portland, Multnomah Co., OR (age 71), and Arabella Sarah Watson: Born September 14, 1847, in New York; Died December 15, 1905, in Ocean Park, Los Angeles Co., CA (age 58). Charles married about 1901 in California to Isabel Edith Matheson: Born June 29, 1879, in California; Died December 21, 1940, in Santa Barbara Co., CA (age 71).

Jessica V. "Jessie" Lemmon: Born January 2, 1902, in San Francisco., CA; Died Unknown. Went to Hawaii in 1930, and probably again in 1933. She was an unmarried Teacher in Santa Barbara 1930 - 1932. Jessica Rea died February 1983 in Honolulu, Honolulu Co., HI, at age 81. By 1941, her name was Jessica Rea and had a child, Charles Rea (born about 1938). In 1939, Jessica Rea (age 36), her husband, Charles Rea (age 53), and their son, Charles P. Rea (age 2), sailed back from Los Angeles to Honolulu. By August 23, 1933, Charles and Jessica were already married. In 1948, Jessica L. Rea (born 1/2/03) and Charles Pedric Rea (born 4/29/37) flew from Honolulu to San Francisco. Charles Pedric Rea was working for the FMC Corporation in 11985. Charles D. Rea.

Charles D. Rea may have been born August 29, 1885, in Southwest Harbor, ME (possibly Tremont, Hancock Co., ME). By 1920, he was already married to Jessie Rea (born December 18, 1890, in Beaver Dam, WI) and had a son, James Rea (born April 2, 1916, in Honolulu, HI), and lived in Eluli, Kauai.

In 1910, Charles D. Rea (age 26) was an unmarried Supt. of Schools and was living in Southwest Harbor, Hancock Co., ME. He is also listed in the 1910 Federal Population Census as living in Lahaina Town, Maui Island, HI.

James Buchanan Rea was born April 2, 1916, in Hawaii and died September 21, 1995, in Los Angeles Co., CA, at age 78. Mother's maiden name was Buchanan.


THE HISTORY OF WASHINGTON LEMMON

Written by Florence Lemmon Burningharn

Among the pioneers who came to Utah and settled in Salt Lake Valley, there were few who lived so long and participated so actively in the work of building up the state as Washington Lemmon. For almost a century he watched the United States grow from a small sparsely settled country, bounded on the East by the Atlantic Ocean and on the West by the Mississippi River, to become a large powerful nation that extended from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean on the West and from Canada to Mexico. He was born at Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky, October 6, 1806 and lived there until 1812 when his father took his family and moved to Indiana. His mother died in Indiana. His father, having a family of small children to take care of, soon found himself another wife. He married Amy Rawlins, 2 April 1818 at Poali, Orange County, Indiana and later moved to Harrison County, Indiana. Washington Lemmon married Tamer Stephens August 31, 1826, Harrison County, Indiana. They were both 19 years old, They were very poor. They had only half of a bake skillet to cook with. Their first two children were born at Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana. In 1828 Washington's father moved to Adams County, Illinois and perhaps he wrote to his son or sent him word that this new country was a land of opportunity because in 1830 Washington took his family and moved to Adams County, Illinois. He acquired a farm near Quincy and worked hard to develop it into one of the best farms in that neighborhood. He lived there for twenty years and ten of his children were born there. Washington Lemmon first heard the message of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints from David Evans, the late Bishop of Lehi, Utah County, Utah. His wife Tamer, was baptized by Jacob Meyers, October 1840 and Washington was baptized by David Evans, March 1841. He became a personal friend of the Prophet Joseph Smith and other leaders of the Church. He was in the Church in the early days of its existence at Nauvoo, Illinois and in Missouri. He took part in those troublesome times, building up and developing the Church, strengthening its membership and aiding in the erection of building for its work. He was a carpenter and he helped build the Nauvoo Temple. In 1844, when the Prophet Joseph Smith was killed, Washington was in Indiana preaching the gospel and campaigning for Joseph Smith to be the next president of the United States, In 1850 he moved his family to Council Bluff, Iowa, where the headquarters of the Church was at that time, it being known as Winter quarters. He spent two years there getting ready to make the trip across the plains. Washington Lemmon and his family came to Utah in the Captain Jolly Company, which was one of the 21 companies of Mormon emigrants that crossed the plains in 1852. Each company having about 50 wagons. The Jolly Company had about 340 souls. They left the Missouri River June 11, 1852 and arrived in Salt Lake Valley September 10, 1852. They crossed the plains in covered wagons. The boys, Leander and Alfred, drove the cattle and when they arrived in Utah they said, "Their feet were so tough a prickly pear could not stick in them, " When they desired butter they would put the cream in the churn and the jar of the wagon would churn the cream to butter. Washington’s oldest son, James William Lemmon, came to Utah with the Mormon Battalion. His second son, John, came with the gold rush and went to California. After the family had been in Utah several years a man came to their place and wanted a place in sleep and something to eat. The family lived on the county road and they had that kind of requests quite often. This night while they were eating the man the man said "I am you son." Tamer, his mother went over to him and turned his sleeve up and there was a scar on his arm and his mother said "Yes, you are my son John." This was a pleasant surprise for the family. The family settled on Dry Creek southeast of Sandy. In the winter Of 1833 Henry Bowden went out by Sandy looking for some of his cattle. A terrible snow storm came up and he lost his way. Washington Lemmon found him nearly froze and wandering around in the snow. He took him to his place and Henry always said, "If it had not been for Washington Lemmon he would have frozen to death. They became very good friends and both of them lived in Millcreek Ward. The career which Washington made for himself marked him as one of the most qualified pioneers who came to Utah. He saw Utah grow from a wilderness to one of the most flourishing and prosperous states in the West. He aided in bringing its agricultural resources up to the present standards. The family moved to Millcreek (it is now 4338 Highland Drive) in the spring of 1853. Washington built his own home including all the doors and the windows and many pieces of furniture. It was a large farm which was used mostly for raising grain, alfalfa and a large fruit orchard. Many of the trees he budded and developed until he had most all kinds of fruit suitable to the Utah climate. He also had good gardens and all kinds of small fruit. He raised bees and sold honey. At different times he had herds of sheep, cattle and horses. He had flocks of chickens, geese, and turkeys which all farmers had for their own use. Washington was about six feet tall and weighed about two hundred pounds. He had brown hair, a high forehead, and blue eyes, He was rail and straight, a very good looking man. He never drank intoxicating drinks or used tobacco. He rode horseback after he was ninety years old. He was a prominent worker in the Church of his choice and enjoyed the confidence and esteem of all the members who knew him. He was known as a man of integrity and unrighteousness. He was counselor to Bishop Miller of Millcreek Ward 1859 - 1882 when Bishop Reuben Miller died he was ordained a High Priest the 26 March 1856 by David Pettegrew, Cottonwood organization of High Priests, Bishop Reuben Miller President. He was ordained a Patriarch 30 March 1884. He received his Patriarchal Blessing from Hyrum Smith (brother of the Prophet) and he was told he was of the tribe of Levi. He died October 2, 1902 at the age of 96 years. The funeral service was held in the Millcreek Ward House, Sunday October 5, 1902. The speakers were Apostle Hyrum M. Smith, Bishop J. C. Hamilton of Mill Creek and U. G. Miller of Murray. The remains were interred in Mill Creek Cemetery. He was survived by nine children, forty-two grand children, sixty-six great grand children, and a number of great great grand children, making five generations.

Sources of information:

1. Biographical Record of Salt Lake and Vicinity

2. Special Correspondence to Newspaper

3. Lemmon family by Francis Marion Lemmon,

4. Life of Washington by Mabel Lemmon.


I understand the Red Bluff Beacon newspaper is on microfilm at the Red Bluff Library. The newspaper was published from March 1857 through Feb 1864. I don't know if it was weekly or monthly or what.

The Red Bluff Beacon was the first paper issued in Tehama County, appearing at Red Bluff in June, 1857. Its proprietors were Steve Clark and Blanton. In September, 1858, the Tehama Gazette was published at Tehama. In August, 1860, the Independent was issued as a semi-weekly. In October, 1865, the Tehama Observer made its debut. In March, 1867, was published the Sentinel. In March, 1872, the Tehama Independent appeared for a season. All these have died. The Sentinel was afterward revived and is now ably conducted by Dr. W. B. H. Dodson & Son, as a daily and weekly. In. September, 1874, the People's Cause, now the oldest paper, was first issued. The Pendleton 'Brothers now carry it on, making it a bright and spicy paper, also daily and weekly. In August, 1875, the Tocsin was first published. In 1883 the name was changed to the Democrat, and again in 1887 to the News, under which name a lively and interesting daily and weekly is now published by E. F. Lennon. The central importance of Red Bluff may be seen when it affords field and scope for three such able papers as the Sentinel, People's Cause, and News. The latter is Democratic, and the two former, Republican in politics.

The first newspaper established in the Boise basin was the Boise News, a small sheet owned and edited by T. J. & J. S. Butler, formerly of Red Bluff, Cal., where they published the Red Bluff Beacon, which was in turn sold in 1862 to Charles Fisher, connected with the Sac. Union. Butler married a daughter of Job F. Dye of Antelope rancho, a pioneer of Cal, and went to farming in the Sacramento Valley. His father-in-law took a herd of beef cattle to the eastern Oregon mines in 1862, and sent for him to come up and help him dispose of them. Butler then started a packing business, running a train from Walla Walla to Boise, and recognizing that, with a public of 30,000 or more, there was a field for a newspaper, took steps to start one, by purchasing, with the assistance of Knapp of the Statesman office in Walla Walla, the old press on which the Oregonian was first printed, and which was taken to Walla Walla. Some other material was obtained at Portland, and the first number of the Boise News was issued Sept. 29, 1863, printing paper costing enormously, and a pine log covered with zinc being used as an imposing-stone, with other inventions to supply lacking material.